Personal Martial Arts

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by 4xdblack, Sep 4, 2017.

  1. 4xdblack

    4xdblack Accomplished Booty-Cop
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    I consider myself a martial arts enthusiast. I love learning about all the different styles that are out there. Their history, application, advantages and even disadvantages. I also love it in fiction, especially martial arts Manga. I've been thinking a lot about it here recently, because I really want to learn one myself, but there are just so many amazing martial arts out there that it's extremely hard to decide.

    So I was wondering if any of you practice a martial art. If so, what style do you use and how has your experience with it been so far? Do you enjoy it? Are you planning on learning more in the future? Have you ever had to use it to defend yourself? Or have you ever participated in any competitions?

    Let's discuss Martial Arts.
     
  2. Shi

    Shi The Aspirer
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    Do you consider Boxing, Martial Arts?

    I've always loved Boxing growing up and I do Boxing Conditioning classes now which I enjoy immensely. I don't take it super seriously though, like I don't go to competitions, but I have had my trainers ask me if I wanted to because in terms of technique and skill, I'm above the class and if I put some time into my diet and strength building, I could be really competitive.

    Some of the trainers have had me do Mitts with them. The observation has been the same: I have good technique and speed with enough strength to one-shot someone if I hit them just right. However I wouldn't be able to last more than 2 rounds due to my poor endurance and stamina.
     
  3. Novaire

    Novaire Serial Editor
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    I don't know much in the way of actual stances, styles and the like beyond what I've learned in the fiction, which I do love. Not that there is much in the way of possible schooling in my area even if I choose to seek it out, I think I am out of their league, so to speak.

    [​IMG]

    Martial arts flicks are probably my favorite genre. Ip Man, Rumble in the Bronx, Man of Tai Chi, Bloodsport, The Green Hornet, Way of the Dragon, The Big Boss, and most recently, Call of Heroes. I love all that shit. The same could be said for the Rocky franchise, if we're counting boxing. The Crow is also one of my favorite movies, if you wanted to count it as a martial arts flick, although I probably wouldn't. I'm a big fan of Jackie Chan and Bruce Lee. I've seen all of the latter's stuff, except Game of Death and Enter the Dragon, which I decided many moons ago to save for a special occasion, seeing as I'm not getting any new stuff from him unfortunately.

    I also love playing fighting games. I've spent more time in my teenage and adult life racking up wins with Ken Masters and E. Honda than I have doing just about anything else in my life.
     
  4. Matemar

    Matemar Corvus

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    I like Martial Arts, because they are... well.. art. It's even in the name. It's art, sure, but most of them were created to either kill or incapacitate your opponents. This, however, just adds to the artistic feel.

    While boxing doesn't fall into the Martial Arts category, I still see it the same way.

    Martial Arts (including boxing) is what I would do if I didn't have basketball.
     
  5. 4xdblack

    4xdblack Accomplished Booty-Cop
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    I do. Boxing is an incredible self-defense tool. Though in terms of martial arts, it's an incomplete martial art. It boasts a sport that involves the use of one's own hands to battle, yet excludes so many different possible techniques.Such as thrusts, low blows, rabbit punches, sucker punches, elbows, forearm strikes, palm strikes, back hands, and hammer fists. I'd love to find a gym that teaches all these things.

    That's why I'm kinda torn between Muay Thai and Boxing at this point.. Muay thai has 6 more weapons than boxing does, and they're incredibly powerful ones too. But it doesn't have the skill, speed, and grace that comes with Boxing. However, one (among many) of the biggest differences, is that Muay Thai focuses on tanking the hits, while Boxing focuses on never getting hit to begin with.

    I definitely want to have a foundation in a striking martial art, but it's difficult to choose because it always seems like strikers are so incomplete. One person I met, instead of taking kickboxing or muay thai, decided to go for boxing and taekwondo. Learning leg and arm strikes respectively. Which I found very interesting.

    I've also considered Karate. Because I like how well rounded it is in terms of attacks. It includes grappling, strikes, joint locks, and submissions. But the biggest problem is that it's become so over commercialized that finding a decent Dojo is like finding a needle in a haystack.
     
  6. Shi

    Shi The Aspirer
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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martial_arts

    Depends on technicality I guess.

    @4xdblack
    EDIT: Lol.. posted this at the same time.

    Take what you think will get you the most mileage. The thing about Boxing is it is a lot of core and legs. While the strikes from your punch is literally the entire sport because thats what causes damage, the technique behind a punch comes from how you balance your legs and whether you use your core to twist into a good punch.

    My legs are weak and have sustained injuries from playing sports, which is why I didn't do Kickboxing, Muay Thai or any martial arts requiring strikes from my legs. I would simply be unable to do utilize the power behind my legs to make effective strikes.

    But I can, however, use my legs as a post to prop up good punches.

    Depending on the gym and the trainer, you do learn a lot. It also depends on what you're learning. Generally speaking, Boxing is taught towards the sports where a lot of the hits you mentioned is illegal so you won't really see a trainer teach you a Rabbit Punch or elbow strikes.

    If your trainer is good, they will teach you good technique and form.

    The good thing about that though is that some of that form does translate in to Kickboxing and Muay Thai. The twisting motion you put into your strikes is where a lot of your power comes from.
     
    #6 Shi, Sep 5, 2017
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2017
  7. 4xdblack

    4xdblack Accomplished Booty-Cop
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    Yeah, that's what I mean when I say grace. Boxing has a large advantage over a lot of other martial arts, in that its footwork is top tier. Helping you avoid attacks as well as setting you up to make them. The biggest disadvantage though is that the legs are used only for footwork. Due to that, you essentially leave your entire lower half open to kicks and other attacks.
    And yeah, all those attacks are against boxing rules. But it's because they are effective. Which is why I say it's an incomplete martial art. I'd love to see someone teach practical boxing over sport boxing. I could imagine that would dominate most arenas.

    I'm wanting to learn a martial art half because I want to defend myself, and half because it looks really fun. But there are so many amazing martial arts out there, that I feel like I could get an equal amount of mileage out of all of them. It's just so hard to decide Dx

    Right now I'm personally thinking I want to learn Boxing, Judo, and Wrestling. Possibly switching out boxing for muay thai. But I think a combination of those 3 would give me an effective and fun style to practice. Plus I could go to the olympics for 2-3 different sports xD
     
  8. Captain Picard

    Captain Picard Non mihi, non tibi, sed nobis.
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    During college, I practiced Heiwadoy-ryu Karate (a derivative of Wado-ryu) but no longer actively train. In 5 years, I progressed to hachi-kyu (8th rank) or second degree brown belt. I loved all the kata, sparring, and espirit of the dojo and my sensei. I even got to train for a year in Iiado.

    Group picture of some of my fellow karateka. I'm the guy front and center with the blue belt

    [​IMG]
     
  9. 4xdblack

    4xdblack Accomplished Booty-Cop
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    If I could find a Karate dojo which has a good teacher and emphasizes self-defense over sport, I would love to take Karate.

    My uncle started out his martial art career in Karate, participating in both the sports and the self-defense aspect of it. Most of his training consisted of conditioning, mostly involving repeated kicks to a metal pole (which is part of the reason he's got bad knees now).

    I remember he told me about how he was able to train with all three Gracies, including old man Gracie.

    And about this mysteriously "effective" style called Haganah
     
  10. Oh Snape

    Oh Snape House Bantsratheon
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    Pretty sure there's some badass hiterto unknown martial art lurking somewhere within me.

    Just waiting for someone to really really piss me off.
     
  11. 4xdblack

    4xdblack Accomplished Booty-Cop
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    Pushing people into their lockers and pulling down their pants isn't generally considered a martial art.
     
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  12. Kerberos

    Kerberos genki moe blob
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    I currently practice Aikido. not sure if that is the kind of martial art you are looking for but let me share my own experience with it so far.

    For me what makes Aikido a valuable ,and to be honest by this point unmissable, part of my life has less to do with it's practical application in a fight (though it does have that) but more its spiritual aspect. Aikido is all about contact. The ai in Aikido is Japanese for harmony. Aikido is about bringing harmony between you and your attacker and not forcefully dominate him or her. It's a wordless form of communication and for someone like me who's always very focussed on verbal communication these techniques and especially how to correctly perform them are very valuable to learn.

    Every technique in Aikido is based on moving with your opponent, you need to be able to feel where he or she wants to go and follow that movement with him or her in order to properly execute a technique. You can't rationally deduce how to perform a technique, you have to feel it. Again, for someone who's always rational and is somewhat disconnected from his emotions this is an immensely valuable thing to learn.

    Another thing that's very important in Aikido is to relax. There's not a single technique you can perform when you're tense. You also mustn't rush. Even black belts perform techniques slowly and with precission. I am someone who has a tendency to always think of twenty thousand things at once and as such I have a strong tendency to be tense and rush through things as quickly as I can. It's only since I took up Aikido that I'm slowly starting to change this and do things more slowly and thoughtfully. About a month ago my mom went to visit me and remarked that this is the first time in my life she's ever seen my shoulders to be completely relaxed. It's moments like that, that remind me of the strong value of Aikido for me.

    And this sense of harmony and calm can be found inside the dojo itself as well. I've practiced other sports before (technically aikido is a discipline and not a sport but that's neither here nor there) but I've always found that while exercising is great for me to relieve some of the build up tension I always carry with me, it also leads to more stress due to the inherent chaotic nature of most sporting activities and the places they take place in. (try going to a gym for instance, it's maddening) Not the case at all with Aikido as in our dojo there is a sense of peace and quiet I've never experienced outside of well...my own room. That sense of harmony is also something that's deeply felt by myself and other practitioners. From group activities most of us participate in such as the annual retreat to something as simple as chatting for a while after class. But also a shared sense of repsonsibilty, the dojo is our home and we all contribute to her daily maintenance. This can be something like helping out with adminstrative duties like I am currently doing but it can also be something as simple as cleaning the tatami (mat) after each class.

    As one sensei once said: "we are not just learning defense techniques, we are learning the entire philosophy of Osensei (a respectful title for Morihei Ueshiba, the founder of Aikido)

    Mind you, this is just my own take on Aikido based on my own experiences practicing it. If you were to talk to practitioner who focusses more on the martial aspect. (like my wednesdays teacher) He or she might tell you something completely different. Though I do know for a fact that there's a larger philosophical aspect to Aikido then there is other martial arts and if tha's something that interest you than you'll probably really enjoy it. If not, that's fine too but then perhaps you'd have more fun practicing another martial art.

    Anyway that's about all I have to say, I'm sorry for the massive wall of text. I tried to keep it short but there was just too much I wanted to say. Hope it was informative or at least fun to read.

    Good luck with your search. Regardless of which martial art you decide to practice, trying new things is something I always encourage! :)
     
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  13. 4xdblack

    4xdblack Accomplished Booty-Cop
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    I've always been a pretty huge fan of Aikido. The movements are so graceful and don't look nearly as strenuous as other martial arts. The problem that I keep running into however, is that Aikido, in order to be effective in it's practical use.. Requires every confrontation to meet two basic requirements. The first is that the opponent has to be directly attacking you. It's nearly impossible to go on the offensive in Aikido. But that's because of reasons you stated yourself. Aikido is about harmony with your opponent. To defend without harming. And the second requirement is that the opponent is inexperienced with grappling. And it's not always easy to meet both those requirements.

    Still a big fan of it though.
     
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  14. Shi

    Shi The Aspirer
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    @4xdblack
    This is just my observation and don't take this too personally, but I feel like you have a reason to not go into something because of a reason. I'd even argue that your analysis of certain styles of fighting may even be preventing you from even jumping in regardless of the reason.

    You should just pick something and go with it. There is no "perfect" fighting style. Every style has a strength and weakness, there are certain match ups where you will never win unless there is a circumstance.

    If you're looking to arm yourself for self-defense, pick something from East Asia. You really can't go wrong.
    If you're looking to compete, wrestling and boxing are great. You won't get illegal moves, but it's still more effective than nothing.
    If you're looking to be a coach, you're well on your way to that as is. You're very observant with the different styles and have a good analysis of said styles.

    I'm a huge proponent of just trying things to see how things go.
     
  15. 4xdblack

    4xdblack Accomplished Booty-Cop
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    So then what do I do when I both want to compete, defend myself, and have fun? lol

    I understand what you're saying, but I do want to correct one thing.

    There are some martial arts that I do see as impractical, therefore I tend to avoid them, yes.. However, I'm not dwelling over the weaknesses of each martial art, but rather I am being constantly captivated by their strengths.

    Also, despite what it might seem.. What's holding me back isn't my inability to decide, but my poor location. I live in a town with a population of 3,500. There's not much to choose from around here. So for now, I'll just fangirl over all the different styles until I fall in love with one.
     
  16. Shi

    Shi The Aspirer
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    @4xdblack
    Sounds like an excuse to me! =P
     
  17. 4xdblack

    4xdblack Accomplished Booty-Cop
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    I wasn't defending myself, you're probably right. I just wanted to correct that one thing xD

    My dad calls it "Shiny new object syndrome"
     
  18. Shi

    Shi The Aspirer
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    I love shiny new objects.
     
  19. Undead

    Undead Senior Member

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    Dont make the mistake I did. I was watching Bloodsport with a co-worker (yea, I was watching it at work) who's son was taking Tai Kwon Do. He referred me to the sensai.
    I will always value the month I was there, but the damage outweighed the benefits. I'm overweight, to say the least. In those 4 weeks, I lost at least 50 lbs., but it wasn't enough to stop my knees from eating themselves.
    The literal translation of Tai Kwon Do is knock off horse. In other words, you jump 5 feet in the air and kick the guy off his horse. Lots of jumping is involved and my knees were overstressed as it was. I had to give it up, but not before learning enough to be able to hold my ground in a fight.
    As for the lifestyle lessons, my sensei belived in being able to run from a fight. Don't fight unless you are forced to defend yourself or to defend someone else. Be forceful (stop the fight) but not deadly. You will learn many very damaging moves. There's nothing wrong with knowing them, but dont use them unless under extreme circumstances. Keep in mind, at least in MA, black belts must register themselves with the police as deadly weapons.
     
  20. 4xdblack

    4xdblack Accomplished Booty-Cop
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    Huh, that's pretty interesting.

    Yeah my uncle experienced the same problem after learning Karate. They say, a martial artist can train their bones and their muscle.. But no one can train their joints.
     

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